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at princeton university, we co-taught a course at the public policy and that led to his co-authored several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, you get to vegetative examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you work, walk us through this. >> guest: this is a tale of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, but resistance to compromise the two parties were. so the comparison between the tax reform act and the afford
study there? >> at princeton i studied the origins and history of ancient christianity. >> you taught in a number of institutions. would you list those for us? >> i taught at princeton briefly, i taught at u.c. berkeley, university of pittsburgh, for a year i was at the hebrew university at jerusalem and currently at boston unive >> you have? >> yes, indeed. >> i got my degree in '79. >> you're the professor of the appreciation of scripture, you've been doing that for what? >> since '90. >> for nine years. three books to your credit? >> that's true. >> i notice that you retreated from some of your statements from your first book, "jesus of nazareth, king of the jews." what changed in the 11 years between the publication of these two books. >> my first book was "from jesus to christ." and that was published in 1988. and "jesus of nazareth" was published a few months ago. what changed is time elapsed, i continued to work in the field and learned more. >> isn't it the all-important question of why jesus was killed, you now believe he represented a limited threat to public order during th
to princeton, yale and eventually right to the supreme court. she credits affirmative action with helping her get there. so when the issue comes before the supreme court, probably in march, how will she rule? we'll talk about justice sonia sotomayor, straight ahead. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> welcome back, everybody. from growing up in the projects to an alcoholic father to princeton, where he was accepted thanks to a new affirmative action program at the time, sonia sotomayor's journey to the supreme court was not an easy one. she chronicles her life in her new book "my beloved world." i had a chance to sit down and talk with her about her world and her past. sonia soto
? >> my wonderful kuhl author -- co-author. many years ago when we were both at princeton university, we've taught a course on efiks and federal policy and that led to less kosoff urning several books on the deliberation and the democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, president gutmann, you give the two legislative examples, the 1986 tax reform, health care that, and if you would walk us through those. >> so this is a tale of two compromises. and it begins with ronald reagan's presidency weare tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to be done between republicans and democrats. those of us who live through the odierno recognize people thought they were very polarized on the staunch liberal democrat. rall riggins's staunch a liberal republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bill bradley and bob packwood being a part of the movers of the compromise. fast forward to the affordable care act it was arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized
sotomayor graduate as valedictorian of her high school class, graduated from princeton university summa cum laude a the highest price for the a director while attending yale law school she was editor of the law journal. she could have become a highly paid lawyer out of yale but she went right into public-service becoming the assistant district attorneys serving the people of new york. she served in almost all levels of the judicial system including private practice as well as years on the federal bench. 2009 president barack obama nominated in the u.s. senate confirmed sonia sotomayor as a 111th justice of the u.s. supreme court. io give you sonia sotomayor. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] spee net after a guide to washington in 2009, i net to a whole bunch of texans from everywhere in this large state. and i have been repeatedly invited to visit. and when you get a new job you are a little busy? so i have not been able to come. but it is a tribute to the warmth of the people that has been confirmed in a few hours i have been here already. that this is the third city on my tour
que es jueza, por usted, que es latina. >>son las dos cosas, me abrieroin las puertas en princeton y yale. esa fue una ayuda tremenda, lo que yo hice, lo hice yo cuando entré' >>hay una niña pequeña, ana márquez que murió en connecticut junto a otros doce niños, esto ha generado debate en estados unidos, usted piensa que la segunda enmienda a la constitucion es que nos permite comprar armas sin restriccion, que piensa >>esas preguntas llegaran a corte en poco tiempo, no puedo dar una opinión. los debates deben seguir, somos ciudadanos y debemos tener y tomar un interés en el gobierno, es impotante que la comunicacion siga >>otro tema. cuando analizaron el caso de ley de inmigración en arizona, usted votó como la mayoría, en la decisión que permite que la policía actúe como agente migratori en arizona, cuando usted vota como latina, piensa en los efectos que tendrá esto en la comunidad latina, o solo se distancia y toma su decisión? >>ninguno de los dos, pienso en ser juez de la corte suprema, pienso en la ley. >>eso me lleva a mis conclusiones >>sonia sotomayor en uni
to princeton. top honors there led to law at yale, and then straight to new york as a prosecutor. the pay was lousy, the hours inhuman. she was smoking three and a half packs a day, listening to victims, sending thieves and killers to prison, and learning something about people. >> sotomayor: they can be evil. i don't know that, before i came to the d.a.'s office, that i understood that there were some people who were that bad. it's one of the reasons i left the d.a.'s office, because that lesson made me realize that if i stayed in the practice of criminal law, i might lose some of my optimism about human nature. >> pelley: are some people beyond redemption? >> sotomayor: people do some very bad things that are still human beings with some redeeming qualities. they can do some horrible things, but they're still valuable human beings in other ways. but yes, i do believe there are some people who are evil and perhaps can't be redeemed. >> pelley: after four years with the d.a. and the end of her marriage to her high school sweetheart, sotomayor cleared her mind and the air. she quit smoking
of princeton in new jersey. nancy, good evening to you. i have to think we keep hearing about the reported cases. i think of how many people are sitting home suffering, not going to doctors or hospitals. are these numbers really just a potential tip of the iceberg here? >> reporter: i think you're looking at two things, these numbers. one, this is not a reportable disease like so many other illnesses like meningitis or hiv. so right now i think we're looking at the federal government having a very different set of numbers and perhaps the hospitals and states that are on the front lines. so we know we have at least 20 pediatric deaths across the country. but you're right when you talk about the people at home suffering, those who see their doctors, those who have been admitted, that's a bigger pool. for those states that have been hit with the cold wave, that nor'easter, two weeks ago, we're now seeing the upspike and that explains for boston having declared an emergency earlier this week and now in new york. >> and we're going to talk in just a second here about the strange weather we're h
's wrong? dr. peter hayes? this is eric foreman at princeton plainsboro. you're doing a signal transduction inhibitor clinical trial. what kind of results have you been-- transduction inhibitors are a decade away. bye, pete! they've got another trial going on at duke. 15% extend their lives beyond five years. if you're positive for protein phf-- stop trying to save me. i'm fine. mra confirms small collections of blood throughout the white matter of patrick's right hemisphere. mind if we chat about that for a few moments? (chase) either trauma, an aneurysm, cancer, or autoimmune disease. we need a biopsy to figure out which it is. his eeg was non-specific. where are you gonna biopsy? everywhere. sure, just put on a blindfold and play pin the tail on the brain. he's bleeding into his brain. he's dying. you can't just randomly stab the temporal lobe and hope you hit the right spot. well, i'm only gonna take little tiny pieces. until what? till i find the problem. or you kill him. no, i'll keep going even if i kill him. then he's screwed. thanks for the chat. what if we do the eeg from inside h
and publisher of "the nation." she is summa cum laude from princeton. she is here with her first collection, "fighting for progress in the age of obama." i do not always agree with her personally when it comes to politics. we are here to find out from katrina how we're going to save the world with barack obama. let's start there. [laughter] >> i do not know how you learned by worked at national lampoon. saving the world. let me begin by saying how low they must be to go that low in new orleans. i would not put in the same sentence president obama and saving the world. it is very much about movements and the power in our history to bring about a fundamental change. you do need people inside, political leaders inside. it captures the imagination of the nation. through the turbulent history, it has been movement and the power of movements. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still e
festival at the oceano hotel and spa at princeton harbor. >> it's tough to see anyway. you'll be better off viewing it from the jumbotron. >> or you can watch highlights here at kpix. this will be cameras on surfers, their boards, the seagulls. that's right. [ laughter ] >> beautiful weather, and the largest crowds ever. and it has been pretty nice today! >> it has been. people are throwing their hands up, just happy with the sunshine. hey, nice day today! repeat coming up for the weekend. changes next week, so let's enjoy this holiday weekend while we have it. temperatures outside, it's another chilly night! already in the upper 30s. santa rose alivermore, con -- rosa, livermore. san francisco, 53. oakland, 52 degrees. a high surf advisory up and down the coast in the bay area. seas are going to build 8-10 feet. some spots could get to 20 feet. watch out for the sneaker waves! every sixth or seventh can be a strong one with a pull out to sea. please, swim with caution, or stay out of the water! concord, december, ton of rainfall. january, 1 quarter of 1 inch of rain. and we're not going to
will be closed and parking very restricted. in nearby princeton by the sea some businesses plan to of oner live video feed of the event. we will have coverage of the surfing competition on sunday starting at 5:00. >>> abc7 news meteorologist sandhya patel is here with more on the high surf and the live doppler 7hd. sandy? >> we will talk about the swells packing high energy. that's why there is a big concern here. right now on live doppler 7hd there are a few high clouds moving through. here is the storm out by the uh lieu sheens. that's generating the large swells and the big waves are expected this weekend. you might be tempted to head out to the beach and check out the competition or just to check out the waves. just be aware of the fact that we are expecting dangerous sneaker waves along the coastline. stay back from the water's edge. avoid slippery rocks. beach hazards in affect until saturday morning. it becomes a high surf advisory saturday 10:00 a.m. to sunday 4:00 p.m. the swells are expected to build up to 20 feet. watch out for the large breaking waves and the strong rip currents. i
swirling as it comes out of the deep south. it dumped 14 or 15 inches of snow in the mountains. princeton, wv picked up 15 inches of snow. we have some advisor is on the central and lower eastern shore. they coucld pick up some accumulation overnight. a blast of cold set to come in. we will track that in a few minutes. >> you can see our interactive radar and be sure to click on the weather. >> the state bill is on the legislative fast-track addressing a court ruling that labeled pit bulls as an inherently dangerous dog. it applies to all dog breeds. under the proposal of dog owners would bear a greater responsibility for dog bite and let large would have less. the bill increases protection for dog owners. it allows all dog owners to defend themselves in court rather than be automatically held responsible. >> a relieves the plaintiff of the obligation to go out and find someone who says that dog bit me. >> the bill would hold landlords level. a bill hearing is scheduled january 30. if it lands on the governor's desk becomes law with his signature. >> opening statements are slated to begin
in the handguns leave alone. >> i think he has to. >> bill: this guy paul krugman whiner teaches out of princeton. he called the president a wimp which i thought was disrespectful. he said he was wimpy in the fiscal debate we don't know why since you are a man of the left krugman talks about a lot of thing. when you sit in ivory tower in princeton and talks about what can and can't be done. is he not in washington. >> bill: why does he think the president is a wimp. >> he didn't get what he thought he should get. 250,000 above. >> bill: so no compromise? the position he went in is the position he should come out with. krugman's probably he is has never served a day in something reasonably involved in negotiations. >> bill: so you are happy with the fiscal thing. >> i wish it would have been 250,000 but it wasn't. >> bill: no? >> i will tell you one thing, the news here is that you and i will both be paying more taxes and we should. >> bill: we should? >> absolutely. >> bill: not al gore. >> he will pay more in taxes. >> bill: i think the deal went down. >> just a little bit hypocritical, remember
at princeton, the evening before alger hiss was scheduled to speak at the university about u.s. foreign policy. alger hiss on foreign policy. here are some of the things edwards said to the assembled stewards, quote, you will be observing, as adroit and charming personality as i have witnessed in 30 years of experience, quote, you will find it difficult to believe that you are listening to a man convicted by a jury of willful perjury to conceal his role as a traitor and a spy. and alger hiss indignantly denied chambers's allegations that he was the communist, i have never witnessed a more convincing display of righteous laugh, and swore he never laid eyes and whitaker chambers. he blinked at a photograph of chambers. less than a month later, confronted with chambers' himself, was to confess that he had indeed known the man and knew him intimately and given him an automobile. out for his was not embarrassed. the picture of injured innocence, failed to recall man whose appearance is that of the man in the photograph shown him. this explained that he had known chambers but under another name, tha
, addressed a large audience of undergraduates at princeton before his long negative hiss was scheduled to speak. alger hiss on foreign policy? what else can one say about the invitation one is politically correct always political correct. [laughter] here is what edwards said to the students "you will be observing as brilliant and adroit and charming personality as i have witnessed in more than 30 years of newspaper experience. you find a hard to believe you're listening to a man of willful perjury as a traitor and a spy. on the house committee denied the allegation that he was a communist. " and never witnessed a more convincing display of righteous wrath quote my father said he said he never laid eyes upon whittaker chambers and blinked at a photograph is an utter amazement "was the moment later confronted with chambers' himself to confess he had indeed been known the man and intimate the and had even given him an automobile quote but he was not embarrassed the pitcher of injured innocence why he had failed to recall the man whose appearance was that exactly of the man that was shown
was a professor at princeton and before that at harvard, new york times best-selling author of numerous books, co-host in the radio show with tavis smiley. there are in this book "the rich and the rest of us." when we sat down in the studio in chicago, two days after the election, i asked cornell west and tavis smiley about the reelection of president obama. i asked them about the fact we are in the president city. he had just flown out the day before and what this next four years means. >> it is morally obscene and spiritually profane to spend billions of dollars on the elections and not have any serious discussion on poverty, trade unions being pushed against the wall, declining wages, the 1% signer doing very well. no talk about drones, dropping bombs on innocent people. we end up with such a truncated discourse as a major problems, ecological catastrophe, climate change, global warming. it was very sad. i'm glad there was not a right- wing takeover, but we in up with the republican rockefeller in black face with barack obama. so that our struggle intensifies. >> that is a pretty rough assessm
father, addressed a large audience of undergraduates in princeton, the evening before alger hiss was scheduled to speak at the university about u.s. foreign policy. alger hiss on foreign policy. what else can one say about princeton's invocation but once politically correct, always politically correct. here are some of the things edwards said to the assembled students, quote, you will be observing as brilliant, as an adroit commack as charming personality as i have witnessed in more than 30, as charming pe as i have witnessed in more than 30 years of newspaper experience. he was convicted by a jury of willful perjury to conceal his role as a traitor and a spy. edwards recalled that in his first appearance before the house committee on american activities, alger hiss in dignity -- indignantly denied allegations that he would communist, quote, i never witnessed a more convincing display of righteous wrath, my father said, as alger hiss swore he never laid eyes on whitaker chambers. he blinked at a photograph of chambers in utter amazement. less than a month later alger hiss confron
was living in princeton them, now in morristown, new jersey. i took a across the street to princeton university press and the like the idea and published it. it seems as if i have become more productive as i have gone over, which is kind of nice because usually you think when you're younger you are more productive. but it seems as if my productivity has increased with age. the spanish baroque is my 13th book. only two of the books and novels the second novel was also published by and some publishin. a lot of people say, what's it like to back-and-forth between journalism, scholarships and fiction? well, it helps if your schizophrenic. i'm not, but it's a little bit like that. i always feel that -- fiction is the hardest for me, by the way. went -- want to have written a doctoral dissertation your ruined for life and being allowed to communicate with normal human beings . so the fiction can along quite a bit later. first and a scholarship. then i moved more and more into books that were more for a general audience. i also do right for magazines from time to time . and i have been invo
, have a master's from the princeton school of public policy, and i have always found it amazing that i have been able to carve a career for myself, as you are doing, not thinking about how the world could be made a better place. for those of you at the clinton school, i think there is no more rewarding thing that you can do. so my appreciation for you, and thank you for inviting me. i have read enough history to know that we have come a long way and i really glad i am leaving today and not in the 16th century. but we have our problems, and these include environmental degradation, we don't have enough clean water, we don't have an of clean energy to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute
will bring a boost to half moon bay. >> smallest boats want most money. >> in princeton bit sea, abc 7 news. >> waves are coming. going to be good enough. >> yes. it's going to be gorgeous weather. >> yes. so problem is that we do have sneaker waves. here is a look and this is the east bay looking towardsestern sky. after glow of sunset but it's gone. this was a spare the air day. mainly cloud free sky skpirkts mild at this hour. we still have 46 degrees in oakland. here in san francisco, 58 redwood city. some spots getting a bit cool. so chilly spots overnight. forecast features looking for rough serve this weekend. by we do expect mild afternoons throughout the weekend and into next week. talking about sneaker waves through tomorrow morning. steve back from water's edge. that is where the coastline with west facing beaches. 4:00 sunday afternoon, northwest. large breaker waves as well. and highs going well, they haven't started to build up yet. lows dropping to 29 in fairfield. 29 in santa rosa. we'll have cold spots. temperatures around the bay and near the coast will be moderating. talk
princeton by the sea some businesses plan to of oner live video feed of the event. we will have coverage of the surfing competition on sunday starting at 5:00. >>> abc7 news meteorologist sandhya patel is here with more on the high surf and the live doppler 7hd. sandy? >> we will talk about the swells packing high energy. that's why there is a big concern here. right now on live doppler 7hd there are a few high clouds moving through. here is the storm out by the uh lieu sheens. that's generating the large swells and the big waves are expected this weekend. you might be tempted to head out to the beach and check out the competition or just to check out the waves. just be aware of the fact that we are expecting dangerous sneaker waves along the coastline. stay back from the water's edge. avoid slippery rocks. beach hazards in affect until saturday morning. it becomes a high surf advisory saturday 10:00 a.m. to sunday 4:00 p.m. the swells are expected to build up to 20 feet. watch out for the large breaking waves and the strong rip currents. i will be back with a look at your holiday weeken
very restricted. in nearby princeton by the sea some businesses plan to of oner live video feed of the event. have coverage we will have coverage of the surfing competition on sunday starting at 5:00. >>> abc7 news meteorologist sandhya patel is here with more on the high surf and the live doppler 7hd.ndy? sandy? >> we will talk about the swells packing high energy. that's why there is a big concern here. right now on live doppler 7hd there are a few high clouds moving through. here is the storm out by the uh lieu sheens. that's generating the large swells and the big waves are expected this weekend. you might be tempted to head out to the beach and check out the competition or just to check out the waves. just bef the fact that we are expecting dangerous sneaker waves along the stay ba coastline. stay back from the water's edge. avoid slippery rocks. beach hazards in affect until saturday morning. it becomes a high surf advisory saturday 10:00 a.m. to sunday 4:00 p.m. the swells are expected to build up to 20 feet. watch out for the large breaking waves and the strong rip curre
debate all summer about whether women can have it all or not. you got the princeton professor with her point of view. >> boy, that was a tough one. tavis: you have sheryl sandberg at facebook with her point of view. this thing has just been back and forth all summer. now you got ann romney on one side. >> i feel like i'm a really good example of having it, having it most. i mean, it sounds very showy to me and very sort of pompous to say i have it all. but the fact is, my kids are intact so far, my husband and i have been married forever. in fact, my kids, i mean, i look at them in awe. they're so much further along emotionally than i was when i was when i was 40 and they're in their 20s. i mean, i look at them like who are you? there's no question that i've made choices. you know, when the kids were younger, i turned down a lot of things, but, yeah. tavis: so i like kevin bacon a lot and i assume you do too. >> i do too. tavis: he's been on this show before. please tell him i said hello. >> i will. tavis: he's sat in that very chair on occasion. >> i will. tavis: i'm only raising this
at princeton. when i sat down with him today, i asked him if the financial system is still at risk, five years later. >> i think we are still at risk. i tell you what i think is the biggest one it is not in the details but in the very broad frame which is that the bank bailout and the things that went around the bank bailout got such a bad nae in political sense with the public that i fear that if we ever have to do anything like that again, we're not going to do it. and it was actually a success even though people think it was a failure. >> susie: you say in your book that there is still a long a againa of unfinished business what. concerns you most? >> a lot of the regulations have not been put in final form and made operational am i will give you a clear example that worries me a lot which is derivatives. there has been from the beginning, the writing of the rules, a controversy over how many should be standardized and put on exchanges where they are safe like stocks andonds. andhow many shld b otc,er-the-c. those were the things that got us into a lot of trouble during the crisis. and i th
know, sure, that works for you, you're at princeton, it works for me, i'm at msnbc, i might not know anyone, so how do we reframe our own invisible capital. you said one of the first things you think about is privilege. >> well, there are things that we benefit from that we had nothing to do with and other things that we should take great credit for. i didn't choose to be born into a middle class family that valued education and entrepreneurship, i was just lucky. but that helps me so i shouldn't feel ashamed about it, i should leverage it. that just makes sense. it helps being a man in a male-dominated industry or to speak english as a first language. all these things help. they're not enough, but they have to be used in a meaningful way. if we don't realize this, then we leave assets on the table. >> that's interesting. so being a male, it obviously is happening. you're a male in a male dominated industry, but you're saying taking a step back, recognizing that this is an asset actually changes the way you can use it? >> right. because otherwise they may be invisible to us, right? s
. >> she is a good friend through host of high school, college and princeton. >> she introduced him to his wife. >> i guess they worked out. they have two great kids. >> sotomayor will be at another event tonight. we'll learn under what circumstances she's giving permission to family and friends to hit her with her new book, and y. >> think, mark. >> there are a lot of viewers showing off their 49ers pride. one little baby gets to have her pick you're taken with the coach at a recent meet greet. and we've seen a lot of pets get into the niners spirit. check out lola. all decked out in red and gold. thanks for joining us for abc 7 news at 4:00. i'm carolyn johnson. a reminder of the alarm clock app is available for your an droid. [ loss of audio ] is [ loss of audio ]
affirmative action programs. it's how she got to princeton. >> yes. i needed help. but once i got there i worked at it. and i proved myself worthy. >> she graduated at the top of her class then the same at yale law school. it's the journey important, she told her audience. remembering where you came from. >> i have told all of my family and friends that if i change in any way they dontd like, in the future, i wrote a heavy book so they can hit me over the head witness. -- with it. and point to it and tell me, reread this. remember how you got here. >> after her talk she stayed on stage, waiting in what turned out to be a long line a woman who knows of her commitment. >> she's led work shops for young people from the bronx and all over new york city. hosting from the supreme court and watched a yankee game with them. >> yes. she's a yankee fan. when asked what she enjoyed more, there is no hesitation. she did ask the audience don't tell about this. >> she's a good sense of humor, thank you very much. >> let's get another check of the forecast now. >> what a day. here is a time lapse view.
could get him into princeton. i told him i could get him into the marine corps, which would be better for him in the long run. one of the interesting things in the dialogue i have had with myself over time is the average age of starting at the i agents is 30. when i first came on, i thought you do your 20 years, retire at 50, and it really precludes us from doing the type of recruiting on campus the other agencies do. over time, i came to find out that for us, we need the experience that we get. having people come in from other careers -- for instance, we have a number of persons who have done fairly well legitimately and honestly on wall street who have come with us who are now doing the investigations of the securities fraud. we had back in the anthrax attacks of 2002, approximately 1000 individuals throughout the united states who had in some way, shape, or form address anthrax in the course of their studies. if you are going to do an interview with someone handling anthrax, you want either a biochemist or someone who has both the background as well as someone who has the investiga
. to watch the event in person, you'll have to go to the oceania hotel and spa at princeton harbor. >> best way to see mavericks is at the mavericks festival. it's something that we were required to do by our county agencies, after the people got washed off the jetty wall and a lot of people got hurt by being out at the beach. >> organizers expect huge waves and sunny skies, which they say should make for perfect surfing conditions. >>> and mavericks is famous for world class surfers taking a big rise on huge waves. >> the wipeouts pretty epic as well sometimes. as dr. kim mull va hill reports, new technology may help surfers tackle the monster waves more safely. >> reporter: mavericks, it's a show like no other. the world's best surfers line up to ride one of the world's biggest breaks, but big wave surfing is not without risk. riding here can be deadly. now a new wave of technology hopes to change that. >> surfer can lay flat on the vest. >> reporter: meet terry moss. >> when a 40-foot wave crashes on you, it's like falling out of a two-story b
estÁ usted? >>> en las dos cosas. me abrieron la puerta. >>> princeton y yale. >>> sÍ. (hablan en inglÉs). entrando a la puerta esa fue una ayuda tremenda. pero lo que yo hice lo hice yo cuando entre. >>> sobre otro de los temas hay una niÑa muy pequeÑa ana mÁrquez que muriÓ en connecticut, junto con otros 19 niÑos. y en estados unidos esto generÓ un enorme debate, la pregunta es si usted cree que la segunda enmienda de la constiuciÓn permite comprar las armas que queremos sin restricciÓn, o con restricciÓn. >>> jorge, son preguntas que llegarÁn a la corte estoy segura en poco tiempo, solo puedo dar una opiniÓn. >>> entiendo. >>> pero eso no quiere decir que el debate no debe de seguir. somos ciudadanos, y los ciudadanos deben dde tener y coger un interÉs, en su gobierno, y en las preguntas que tienen la sociedad. es importante que la conversaciÓn siga. >>> otro tema:usted cuando analizaron el caso de la ley de inmigraciÓn de arizona, voto con la mayorÍa. 5-3 en la decisiÓn que permite que la policÍa actue como agente migratorio en arizona, mi pregunta es ¿usted
princeton, 15 inches. a couple inches around raleigh, durham. and through central virginia. some spots the lord eastern shore of maryland as well. -- on the lower eeastern shore of maryland as well. that is what occurred with that storm tracking by yesterday. wider amounts as the storm was moving past as. -- leiter amounts as the storm was moving past us. the cold behind the storm kept a high temperature below normal. the low so far has been 32. with the storm leaving us and high pressure moving in, the skies had cleared from southern new england down to the carolinas. temperatures already back a bit to the upper 20's? >> county. 20's in the upper carol county. lows will be in the 20's tonight. there is a lot of dry, mild weather of here. -- out here. that will come streaming into the mid-atlantic tomorrow. warm air 58 in denver. on sunday, some of that cold from canada comes sweeping south. enjoy tomorrow. it will be a sunny day, westerly breeze keeping temperatures mild. on sunday, this hint that stretches from cape cod just east of foxboro right into baltimore. that is the leading e
firm of ryan gave. he graduated with honors from princeton university where he majored in religion. and he received a bachelor of divinity degree from the. >> divinity school, and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for seven years and then began his political career in 1968, when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first race for public office. he was reelected to that post in 1972. missouri voters didn't elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. and reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service there. senator danforth initiated major legislation in areas such as international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed to council by attorney general janet reno to investigate the federal raid on the branch davidian compound in waco, texas. he later represented the united states and u.s. ambassador to the united nations, and serve as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, to st. louis, and the washington university.
is professor at princeton university and richard haass president of the council on foreign relations and also were both directors of policy planning at the state department. also ian bremer, the president of the eurasia group, a global risk consulting firm. welcome all. so the first one i want to talk about is assad. you thought last year he would have fallen by now. most people did. it looks like a better prediction this year, but it seems as though it's even conceivable that he could wait out 2013 or no? >> no, i don't think so. i would say he hasn't fallen yet, but we're now into the end game where it's clear he's going to fall and just a question of how long, not just we're predicting, we want him out, but he really is on his way out. i don't think there is any way he will survive 2013, but i'm not convinced there will be a government to replace him by the end of 2013. >> why has he stayed there as long? i was more skeptical that he would fall quickly and the reason was simple. the syrians have a great army, a very strong army, and they have been incredibly brutal in their willingness to
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